Update

Move into 2016 by finding calmness within the chaos of our world

Feeling overwhelmed and knocked off course is very common as we come to the end of the year, and maybe especially so in 2015. Each person’s life is being touched by the state of the world. It is a time of great change and it is hard to know ‘which end is up.’

If we were computers, defragging ourselves might seem like the thing to do. One of the most effective and easiest ways to do this as a human being is to come to a ‘still point.’ Just sitting quietly and following the rhythm of our breath is often the simplest way to accomplish this. No doubt our mind will start to chatter going over ‘to do’ lists. Let that float by and enjoy doing nothing, just being.

This process allows our automatic nervous system to go from over activity to relaxation – from doing, to being. It allows us to transition from creating an environment of inflammation and illness in our physical and non-physical body to creating a healing environment in our entire being: physical, emotion, mental and spiritual bodies (PEMS).

I encourage you to take time for yourself and go to the still point within yourself to allow for conscious being time. You will find that you have more clarity about the choices you make in your life.

The question you may want to ask yourself as you begin 2016 is: ‘If I knew I could not fail, what would I do with the rest of my life?’ As you follow your heart-felt answers you will find greater calmness within yourself, even as the world’s chaos continues to try and sort itself out.

All the best to you in 2016.

Dr. Verna Hunt, BSc DC ND

By |December 12th, 2015|Update|Comments Off on Move into 2016 by finding calmness within the chaos of our world

Transitions are best managed through resiliency and responsiveness.

As many of you may know, naturopathic medicine in Ontario – first granted a license 90 years ago in 1925 – has been granted an updated licensing as of July 1, 2015. For more information on this go to www.oand.org, www.collegeofnaturopaths.on.ca. In general this transition is good for the profession and good for our clients. Many administrative glitches that are currently affecting the full scope that we used to practice under still need to be clarified over the next few years, as is often unfortunately common with anything new.

This is my 36th year in practice and my 33rd as a naturopathic doctor. The changes we are going through now in naturopathic medicine in Ontario can be of great benefit, however it is important that we keep to our founding  principles so that we do not lose the legacy of knowledge of those that have come before us.

These elders are the ones that survived in practice when the NDs in Ontario numbered under 50 registrants.  I encourage all my colleagues to speak up, especially those with years of practice, even though it appears at times we are not talking in the social media language of our younger colleagues. Each of you has gems of wisdom to share (check out The Legacy Project on the OAND web site). I encourage the younger NDs to ask the long-time practicing NDs how they survived in practice and what made them resilient and successful, clinically and financially, in their vocation.

Let us mentor each other during this time of change and respond to what the future has in store for naturopathic medicine in Ontario.

Many of you have asked when I will be teaching again. Probably next year. I have just completed the rebuild and sale of my office business condo after the May 2013 fire. I am recuperating and seeing clients about 3 days per week.

See you at the OAND convention September 25–27, 2015.

By |September 10th, 2015|Update|1 Comment

July 2015 Update

Greetings:

As of July 7, 2015, the business condo is sold and I am free of the fire issues. What a relief for me and my staff – Barbara and Laura. They have been a tremendous support for the last 26 months along with many friends and relations.

I have just returned from the CAND Health Fusion Convention in Calgary where I spoke on “Using Naturopathic Manual Therapies to Address Metabolic Cellular Stasis.” The talk went well and I am looking forward to doing more teaching in the years to come.

My next trip is to the Gros Morne Park area in western Newfoundland where I will be mentoring Joanie Cranston, PT, in her Physiotherapy Clinic at The Old Cottage Hospital in Norris Point for 5 days. I will also be relaxing for 10 days in Woody Point, breathing the freshest air in the world, walking on gorgeous trails and eating lots of fresh fish.

I look forward to having a year of recuperating, and beginning writing and teaching, as well as clinical work 3 days per week with clients. I will keep you posted.

Be well.
Dr. Verna Hunt, BSc DC ND

By |July 6th, 2015|Update|Comments Off on July 2015 Update